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  • 05
  • THE DAWNING OF THE AVANT-GARDE
    Expressionism in Berlin 1910–1918

    The emergence of Expressionism polarised Berlin's art scene. Many of the now established Secession artists adopted a critical stance, rejecting the new style. In 1910, a group of mainly young artists, many of whom were active in the field of Expressionism, separated from the Secession because their works had not been admitted to the annual exhibition. They founded the New Secession in Berlin, which existed from 1910 to 1914. Alongside Herwarth Walden's avant-garde gallery Der Sturm, this association played a key part in establishing Expressionism in Berlin and Germany.

    Even before the First World War, the Expressionists painted reality as a world that was tense and “out of joint”. Their art was set in Berlin, the youngest of all Europe’s big cities. In many socially critical works of the period, its streets are populated by those injured in the war, prostitutes and beggars. With the onset of the First World War, many artists no longer wished to convey universally valid truths, but to express their personal experiences of war, destruction and upheaval.

Exhibited Objects

Results:  7

Portrait of Herwarth Walden
  • 1917
  • Bronze
  • 53 x 37 x 35 cm (Objektmaß)
Portrait of Nell Walden
  • 1916
  • Öl auf Leinwand
  • 100x80 cm (Bildmaß)
Doomsday
    • Ludwig Meidner (1884 - 1966)

  • Doomsday

  • 1916
  • Öl auf Leinwand
  • 100 x 150 cm (Bildmaß)
Portrait of Felixmüller
  • 1915
  • Öl auf Leinwand
  • 115 x 80 cm (Bildmaß)
Falling Angel
  • 1914
  • Öl auf Leinwand
  • 187 x 187 cm (Bildmaß)
Lot and His Daughters
  • 1911
  • Öl auf Leinwand
  • 125 x 151 cm (Bildmaß)
Landscape, Painting I
  • um 1914
  • Öl auf Leinwand
  • 81 x 100 cm (Bildmaß)