Results:  1

  • 16 17 1 15 3 4 2 14 5 6 13 11 10 7 9 8 12
  • 10
  • New Objectivity
    Berlin, the Metropolis of the 1920s

    Berlin in the 1920s was an industrial metropolis, a centre of entertainment, and a rapidly expanding big city. It soon became the favourite city of the artistic avant-garde. But the new social order of the Weimar Republic was fragile. Bitter social and political conflicts attended the transformation to democracy.

    The art critic Paul Westheim called the Berlin of the 1920s “Europe’s most objective capital”, describing a dominant mood of the times. In art too, a sober style developed after the First World War, and it soon came to be known as New Objectivity [Neue Sachlichkeit]." Its representatives were interested in the visible world, sharpening their outlook on unspectacular, everyday phenomena. In their paintings it is possible to find milieu studies of every social class, sometimes coupled with obvious social criticism.

    The booming magazine industry of the 1920s increased the demand for a new type of photography. Reportage was beginning to develop alongside fashion and commercial photography. Its objectivity made this form of photography appear the best medium for objective reporting.

Exhibited Objects

Results:  11

Max Schmeling at the Training Camp in Greenkill Lodge/Kingston, New York, June 1932
  • Juni 1932
  • Silbergelatinepapier
  • 23 x 33,6 cm (Bildmaß)
Spectators at a Football Match between Yale and Harvard, Boston
  • 1932
  • Silbergelatinepapier
  • 23 x 33,7 cm (Bildmaß)
Store detective at S. Klein on Union Square in New York
  • 1932
  • Silbergelatinepapier
  • 23,1 x 33,6 cm (Bildmaß)
The Folly Square
  • 1931
  • Öl auf Leinwand
  • 97 x 195,5 cm (Bildmaß)
On the Road in the United States
  • 1930/1932
  • Silbergelatinepapier
  • 23 x 33,7 cm (Bildmaß)
Crossing to Ellis Island, New York
  • 1932
  • Silbergelatinepapier
  • 23 x 33,6 cm (Bildmaß)
Fairfax Hunt Club, Virginia
  • 1930/1932
  • Silbergelatinepapier
  • 22,9 x 33,4 cm (Bildmaß)
Berlin Rear Buildings
  • 1929
  • Öl auf Leinwand auf Sperrholz
  • 113,5 x 94 cm (Bildmaß)
Farewell
    • Hermann Nonnenmacher (1892 - 1988)

  • Farewell

  • 1928
  • Mahagoniholz
  • 104 x 38 x 20 cm (Objektmaß)
Self-Portrait, Warning
  • 1927
  • Öl auf Leinwand
  • 98 x 79 cm (Bildmaß)
Berlin Street Scene
  • 1921
  • Öl auf Hartfaserplatte
  • 74 x 103 cm (Bildmaß)