Results:  1

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  • 13
  • A city in ruins
    Berlin after the War, in 1945

    At the end of the Second World War, not only the German capital had been destroyed, but also extensive areas of Germany and Europe. Millions of people had died or been uprooted as the consequence of tyranny and war.

    Artists dealt with this suffering in various ways: photographers captured the final battles and the widespread destruction in their images. Painters and sculptors created emphatic portrayals of terror and death, of mourning and a lack of perspective, but also symbols of hope in a new beginning. Some of the images were intended to accuse or stir up a reaction to the crimes of tyranny. However, then and in subsequent years, others served as a means of political debate between East and West.

Exhibited Objects

Results:  8

Berlin under the Blockade
  • um 1948
  • Silbergelatinepapier
  • 27x34,3 cm (Bildmaß)
Still Life of Houses (Cityscape – Folding Picture)
  • 1954
  • Öl auf Leinwand
  • 60 x 105 cm (Bildmaß)
Untitled (Tempelhof Airport during the Airlift)
  • 1948
  • Silbergelatinepapier
  • 29,4x39,2 cm (Bildmaß)
Untitled (At the Oberbaumbrücke)
  • 1948
  • Silbergelatinepapier
  • 27,9x35,6 cm (Bildmaß)
Berlin will remain free. View from Roof of Reichstag
  • 9. September 1948
  • Silbergelatinepapier
  • 29,3x38,8 cm (Bildmaß)
Door to Nothingness
  • nach 1945
  • Öl auf Pappe
  • 100 x 70 cm (Bildmaß)
Door
    • Werner Heldt (1904 - 1954)

  • Door

  • um 1946
  • Wachskreide und Schminkfarben auf Holztür
  • 151,5 x 58,5 cm (Objektmaß)
Suburban Cinema
  • um 1945
  • Öl auf Hartfaser
  • 62 x 87 cm (Bildmaß)